Isotope dating method

If the mineral contained 1 part per million Parentium-123 and 3 parts per million Daughterium-123, we could be sure all the Daughterium-123 was originally Parentium-123.

Furthermore, Parentium and Daughterium are so different in chemical properties that they don't otherwise occur together.

If there were such a pair of isotopes, radiometric dating would be very simple.

We could be sure that a mineral containing parentium originally had no daughterium.

Yet few people know how radiometric dating works or bother to ask what assumptions drive the conclusions. This figure wasn’t established by radiometric dating of the earth itself. Radiohalos shouldn’t exist, according to conventional wisdom!

Though they are very tiny, polonium radiohalos have a huge message that cannot be ignored.

They point to a catastrophic origin for granites, consistent with the biblical timeframe for earth history and God’s judgment during the Flood.Imagine we have an undiscovered element, Parentium, that has a radioactive isotope, Parentium-123, which decays to stable Daughterium-123.Many geologists claim that radiometric “clocks” show rocks to be millions of years old.However, to read any clock accurately we must know where the clock was set at the beginning.Most people think that radioactive dating has proven the earth is billions of years old.After all, textbooks, media, and museums glibly present ages of millions of years as fact.

498 Comments

  1. If the mineral contained 1 part per million Parentium-123 and 3 parts per million Daughterium-123, we could be sure all the Daughterium-123 was originally Parentium-123.

  2. In other words there was originally 4 parts per million Parentium-123 and 0 parts per million Daughterium-123.

  3. Since there is now only 1/4 of the original amount of Parentium-123, we know that two half-lives of Parentium-123 have elapsed.

  4. This is the only way Parentium-123 decays, and there is no other source of Daughterium-123.

  5. Furthermore, Parentium and Daughterium are so different in chemical properties that they don't otherwise occur together.

  6. If there were such a pair of isotopes, radiometric dating would be very simple.

  7. We could be sure that a mineral containing parentium originally had no daughterium.

  8. Yet few people know how radiometric dating works or bother to ask what assumptions drive the conclusions. This figure wasn’t established by radiometric dating of the earth itself. Radiohalos shouldn’t exist, according to conventional wisdom!

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